SIGIR '09

Placing Flickr Photos on a Map. They place photos on a map based only on the tags of those photos. They exploit both info from nearby locations and spatial ambiguity

When More Is Less: The Paradox of Choice in Search Engine Use. They show that increasing recall works counter to user satisfaction, if it implies a choice from a more extensive set of result items. They call this phenomenon the paradox of choice. For example, having to choose from six results yielded both higher satisfaction and greater confidence than when there were 24 items to choose from

Telling Experts from Spammers: Expertise Ranking in Folksonomies. They presented a method in which power early-adopters  score highly. I call power early-adopters those who promptly tag items that happen to then become popular in the future.

Good Abandonment in Mobile and PC Internet Search. ” Investigation of when search abandonment is good (when the answer is right in the results list – no need to open page). Good abandonments are much more likely to occur on mobile device as opposed to PC; varies by locale (looked at US, Japan, China) and by category of query. “Our study has three key findings: First, queries potentially indicating good abandonment make up a significant portion of all abandoned queries. Second, the good abandonment rate from mobile search is significantly higher than that from PC search, across all locales tested. Third, classified by type of information need, the major classes of good abandonment vary dramatically by both locale and modality.”

Page Hunt: Improving Search Engines Using Human Computation Games.
Called Page Hunt, the game presents players with web pages and asks them to guess the queries that would produce the page within its first five results. Players score 100 points if the page is no.1 on the list, 90 points if it’s no.2, and so on. Bonuses are also awarded for avoiding frequently-used queries.

danah boyd’s gave a GREAT talk titled ‘The Searchable Nature of Acts in Networked Publics‘. In it, she debunked 3 myths about social networks:
1. There is only one type of social network. NO! There are 3 types of net
1) sociological network  (created from sociological study)
2) articulated network (created from listing friends)
3) behavioral network (created from interaction patterns)
those nets are very different but we have a tendency to assume they’re the same thing!!!

[Student Project Idea] Test whether the 3 types of social networks are related to each other and, if so, how!

2. Social ties are all equal. NO. The context of those ties and how strong they are are two important aspects, for example. (we have been discussing why context matters)
3. Content is King. In the tweet ‘i’m having for breakfast…’, the content isn’t important at all – it’s all about the awareness of sharing an experience.
danah then argued that social network sites are a type of networked public with four properties that are not typically present in face-to-face public life: persistence (what you say online it stays online), replicability (content can be duplicated (and can be taken of out-of-context – often u can’t replicate context)), searchability ( the potential visibility of content is great), and invisible audiences (we can only imagine the audience).  This networked public creates a new sense of what is public and what is private. For example, young people care deeply about their privacy, but their notion of privacy is very different from that of audults. finally,  danah introduced few stats on twitter (5% of accounts are protected, 22% include http://, 36% mention @user, 5% contain #hashtag, RT 3% are retweets, & spam accounts are proliferating) and highlighted some interesting research points for the future: 1)  how to make sense of content for such small bits of text; and 2) how social search can exploit analysis of the  network of twitters,  of context, and of tie strength.

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